To me, T-shirts are big cotton canvases. This is why I dive for the large prints and the all-over prints instead of the ones with relatively small graphics (with the exception of awesome logotypes, in which case, anything goes). Two more fun ones to add to my pile:

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Shit, did I miss the premiere of ANTM? I’m resisting the urge to deposit the contents of my day into a post. In the interest of being slightly more productive, I’m scoping out NY’s Fashion Week and researching, i.e devouring papers, figures, and statistics, to better formulate positions on some policy issues in the upcoming election.


Not gonna lie, I picked these Timberlands via some epic “dumpster diving.” They were next to this cool shelf that I also nabbed. And knowing full well that these were made of, I threw them in the washing machine because you can never trust shoes that have been worn previously. Unless they were owned by a serious sneakerhead or anyone with sole addiction…

To my dismay, the tumbling and laundry detergent eradicated what little remained of the waterproofing finish and the natural oils in the leather. The battered boots came out faded and had an fibrous air of suede (see top right). Unacceptable.

So I whipped out my oldschool care kit (see top left, with the houndstooth) and brushed in some polish to recondition & waterproof the leather – ah, the smell of petroleum products!- and now they are good as new (see below). The color has returned: a deep black, glossy sheen.

Shoelaces are destroyed by my standards. People who buy $60-$130 Timberlands, you need to take better care of your leather & not tear up the laces. Don’t buy shoes just to fuck ’em up and toss ’em because you have no idea how to keep ’em nice. Leather demands maintenance.

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